at the Biscuit Factory, London March 2019

 
Installation view from  Love Stories , group show at the Old Biscuit Factory London, March 2019

Installation view from Love Stories, group show at the Old Biscuit Factory London, March 2019

I Love Mummy, 2012 - 2016

My paintings are arrived at intuitively but are sometimes started with an idea, which in this instance is my son’s childhood and the extraordinary love and excitement with which it infused my life. The painting underwent several stages and was originally inspired by drawings made by my son between the ages of 3 and 5. The silk dress attached to the canvas was made by me years before the birth of my son. Its inclusion here works on many levels: at an instinctive level the delicate pink dress carries its own life-force through which the flux of experience is interpreted in terms of time, while the torn threads become a different kind of brushstroke, one of them carrying the sentence “and on this cloth I found embossed love, love, love” from An Autobiography of a Yogi in which the original word “God” is replaced by “love”.

I Love Mummy , the white version 2012, oil stick, pencils, crayon and silk dress on canvas

I Love Mummy, the white version 2012, oil stick, pencils, crayon and silk dress on canvas

I Love Mummy , the black version 2014, oil, pencils, crayon and silk dress on canvas

I Love Mummy, the black version 2014, oil, pencils, crayon and silk dress on canvas

I Love Mummy , 2016, oil paint, pencils, crayon and silk dress on canvas

I Love Mummy, 2016, oil paint, pencils, crayon and silk dress on canvas

 

at the OXO Tower Bargehouse, London 2018

 
Installation view

Installation view

“You have made a cracked, tired wall into a temple: noble and moving, truthful and silent, august yet humble. It breathes life into the memories of our past and reminds me of treasures and loved ones of the past.” (Alexander Samuel K-N)

A Brief Exposure , 2018, oil on Linen, 170 cm x 170 cm

A Brief Exposure, 2018, oil on Linen, 170 cm x 170 cm

While painting this I was listening to ‘Nothing to Be Frightened Of’ by Julian Barnes and words, even whole sentences made their way into the painting, but many are no longer visible having been covered up in the process by other layers of paint.